ANSWERS

What are the rules in Sport Ju-jitsu (extract)

PART 3 – SPORT JU-JITSU CONTEST AND SCORING [EXTRACT]

 

Article S 1 DURATION AND OVERVIEW OF A CONTEST MATCH

S1.1    Match Duration – All contests consist of 2 rounds of 2 minutes of continuous fighting. In the event of a 2-round tie, a third round of 2 minutes will be played to decide the winner. Should a tie still prevail, additional rounds of 30 seconds will be played until a winner is decided.

S1.2    Calls – Competitors must be aware of 4 calls, namely “BEGIN”, “BREAK” “HOLDING” and “CONTINUE” given only by the referee.

S1.3    Informal bow – Competitors must bow to each other before and after the match. Refusal to do so will constitute an immediate disqualification by the referee.

S1.4    Start position – The contest shall begin with both competitors facing each other in a standing position, the referee facing towards the table with red to his or her right and white to his or her left. After making a standing bow, the contest will start after the referee’s call to “BEGIN”.

S1.5    Scoring by the judges – will be tabulated using mechanical hand counters (clickers). Each hand counter must have attached a suitable size flag representing a competitor (red in the right hand and white in the left).

S1.6    Match area – Competitors will compete within the match area and all techniques are to be executed from within that area.

S1.7    At the end of each round – the referee will instruct the fighters to “BREAK” and return to the starting position, the referee will first confirm that all judges are ready, and then call “CALL” for a show of flags and the corner judges will raise the appropriate flag. In the event of a draw both flags must be raised.

S1.8    Each round will stand on its own merit – and hand counters will be cleared subject to article O3.4 (duties of the mat arbitrator).  Penalty infractions however will be cumulative from each round.

Article S 2 DECISION OF A CONTEST MATCH

S2.1    Decision – A win in two rounds, or 1 round plus 1 round drawn, will decide the winning competitor

S2.1.1             In the event of a tie – a third round will be played to decide the winner. Should a tie still prevail, additional rounds will be repeated until a winner is decided.

S2.1.2             A third round – is only played when there is a draw after the first 2 rounds i.e. if there is 1 win each or 2 draws. If there is a draw and a win in the contest, the winner of the contest will be the competitor who won a round.

S2.1.3             In the event of an injury – except as provided hereunder in article S2.3 (injury due to a foul) the opposing competitor will be awarded the win.

S2.2    Disqualification – if a competitor is issued a disqualification at any time during the match (first round, second round, during overtime), this signifies a loss of the contest and the other competitor wins

S2.3    Injury due to a foul – If a competitor is injured due to a majority called infraction (foul) and cannot continue the offending competitor cannot be awarded the win for that match. The win must go to the injured competitor.  The medical or senior appointed qualified first-aid officer must make the decision for an injured competitor not to continue fighting and the competitor cannot recommence competing in the Tournament until he or she is given medical / first aid approval. The referee should be informed of this.

S2.3.1              Where it is ruled that a competitor has ‘intentionally’ injured their opponent this may invoke a ‘major disqualification’ as defined in article S 16 (disqualification).

S2.4    Injury not due to a foul – If a competitor sustains an injury that is not attributed to a foul, and cannot continue then the referee will call for a score from the judges and award the round accordingly.  If the competitor is injured in the first round then the second round will be awarded to the opponent.

S2.4.1              Recovery time – At the discretion of the referee in consultation with the judges, a competitor may be allowed up to 2 minutes to recover from an injury following which the competitor must either continue or the round must be decided.

S2.5    Injury with bleeding or a wound – The round will be stopped and “time-out” called to allow the competitor to be attended to.  If the bleeding cannot be controlled within 2 minutes the round will be called as herein article S2.3 or S2.4.  Any blood on the mat surface must be cleaned before play continues.

Article S 3 METHOD OF CONTEST – Force Required to score

S3.1    Light Force or touch contact – Where contact is permitted this is the only level of acceptable force and applies to all forms of competition – refer to ‘rules of contact’ for each type of technique.

S3.2    Excessive Force – A call for excessive force indicates that in the opinion of the referee or a judge a competitor used force in excess of that necessary to score. In determining a call for excessive force the following will guide the decision:

S3.2.1             A technique does not contact – however in the opinion of the referee or a judge would have been excessive if the technique had made contact.

S3.2.2             Regard for safety – A competitor attempts or performs a technique that in the opinion of the referee or a judge does not have sufficient due regard for the safety or welfare of the opponent.

S3.2.3             Opponents movement – The onus is upon competitors to have sufficient skill and control in their technique and the movement of the receiving competitor will not reduce a call for excessive force.

S3.2.4             Injury sustained – Should a competitor sustain an injury as a result of the level of force then the referee is required to call the judges together.

S3.3    Potential Force – The scoring of a strike or kick is awarded by a judge on his or her assessment of the ‘potential force’ of the technique. This relates to the control within a technique as assessed by a judge in awarding a score, for example a controlled strike or kick delivered to a legal target area by a competitor without having fully extended the arm or leg.

Article S 4     METHOD OF CONTEST – GRAPPLING (INCL TAKING HOLD)

S4.1    Standing [15 seconds] – Once a competitor takes hold of his or her opponent in any ‘legal manner’ both competitors will have approximately 15 seconds to commence a ‘legal takedown’, after which time the referee shall call “BREAK”.

S4.1.1             In the standing position both competitors may continue to score with legal strikes and or kicks satisfying the requirements in article S8 (strikes and kicks). A competitor who is on the ground as the result of an ’illegal takedown’ cannot be scored on.

S4.2    On the Ground [30 seconds] – Once a competitor has gone to the ground following a ‘legal technique’ the referee will call “HOLDING” and the timekeeper shall allow 30 seconds (see also article S6.3 takedowns) in which time either competitor may attempt to obtain a legal submission on the other.

S4.2.1             Contestants will fight Ju-jitsu / Judo style of groundwork – and will be allowed to use locks, strangles, pinning techniques, and strikes, all subject to the criteria and limitations stipulated within articles S5 to S8 – scoring techniques.

S4.2.2             While manoeuvring during the grapple competitors are permitted to be in a lying, sitting or kneeling position, may push with feet or hands, and may capture the opponent with their legs. Except as in article S4.2.4 herein, a competitor is not permitted to continue to attack while standing.

S4.2.3             On the ground it is illegal – to kick, or go for the eyes, ears, nose, hair, the groin area, or strike to the head or back.

S4.2.4             Coming to the feet – Once “HOLDING” has commenced should one or both competitors come to a standing position the holding will continue for the full time period unless the holding is released by both competitors, or the referee calls “BREAK”.

S4.2.5             Stalemated – The referee should stop the grappling if he or she thinks the competitors are stalemated or after a signal from a judge who may have seen an infraction.

S4.3    If a contestant submits – or the referee calls “BREAK”, the fighters must release all holds immediately.

S4.4    Nerve Pressure – the applying of pressure to nerve points within legal striking target areas plus the inside of thigh (not groin), whilst grappling is permitted when used to assist in manoeuvring an opponent however not to gain a submission.

S4.5        Rules of Contact

S4.5.1             Due care / Excessive force – Techniques are to be executed with due regard and care for the safety of the opponent.  The use of excessive force in the application of a technique will be penalised, this may include where a competitor lands on top of his or her opponent in the execution of a takedown or throwing technique.

S4.5.2             After Holding – A competitor who has come to their feet after the call of “HOLDING” is not allowed to lift his or her opponent off the mat.

Article S 5     SCORING TECHNIQUES – SUBMISSION

S5.1    Win by Competitor Submission – a competitor will win the current round where their opponent signals their submission to a legal technique.  The observation of a referee that a competitor has submitted will have the support of all judges and cannot be challenged.

S5.2    Win by decision – may be awarded for the current round to a competitor for a legal submission technique, where the referee with the support of one judge and without a competitor submitting is satisfied that the following criteria have been met:

S5.2.1             The submission technique was controlled and satisfied the rules of contact.

S5.2.2             To allow the continuation of the submission technique may result in injury.

The referee will call “Break” and then call “Judges on the submission CALL” the support of one judge plus the referee will result in a win of the current round.  Where the referee stands alone on his or her call then the referee will instruct the judges to add five (5) points to the successful competitor.

S5.3    Submission not successful – Two (2) points total may be awarded where a judge is satisfied that a competitor was controlled on the mat by a legal submission hold for a period of five (5) seconds albeit the submission was not achieved. Note a competitor would not receive 2 points if 5 points are awarded.

S5.4    Legal submission technique means:

S5.4.1             A joint technique – to the: wrist, arm, shoulder, ankle or leg (but NOT the knee joint or any technique that twists the knee),

S5.4.2             A strangulation technique – but not throttles or chokes (defined as impairing the airway)

S5.5    Standing submission – A legal submission technique may be applied in a standing position and the opponent may be manoeuvred to a ground position provided there is no attempt to throw the opponent with a lock or strangle applied. Transition to the ground must be with due regard and care for the safety of the opponent.

S5.6    On the Ground submission – A legal submission technique may be applied in a grappling position on the ground provided the technique is applied within view of the referee.  If through the movement of the competitors, the referee is not able to monitor the technique then he or she will call “BREAK” and may either call for a submission under article S5.2 (win by decision) or declare no submission points, although 2-points under article 5.3 (submission not successful) may still be awarded by judges.

S5.7        Rules of Contact

S5.7.1             Competitors must be aware that the use of excessive force in the application of a technique or throwing or attempting to throw an opponent with a technique applied will be penalised.

Article S 6     SCORING TECHNIQUES – THROWS

S6.1    Throwing – Five (5) points may be awarded to a competitor for a legal throwing technique, where a judge is satisfied that the following criteria have been met:

S6.1.1             The technique was controlled and satisfied the rules of contact.

S6.1.2             The competitor was thrown to the ground with control using a shoulder, hip or hand technique.

S6.1.3             Commentary 1:   the throwing competitor performs the throw in a standing or on one knee position, and both feet of the opponent are projected upward to a height above the rest of the body. – This includes a technique where both legs are scooped upward.

Commentary 2:   where the throw does not quite satisfy the above criteria as to the projection of both feet upward, then either four (4) or three (3) points may be awarded to the competitor.

S6.2    Throwing – Three (3) points may be awarded to a competitor for a legal throwing technique, where a judge is satisfied that the following criteria have been met:

S6.2.1             The technique was controlled and satisfied the rules of contact.

S6.2.2             The competitor was thrown to the ground with control using a foot or leg sweep, or by a sacrifice throw where the throwing competitor commits his or her own body to the ground in performing the technique.

S6.2.3             Foot sweeps must be executed below mid-calf, using either the instep (top padded area of foot) or sole of the foot; otherwise may be interpreted as an illegal technique.

S6.3    Takedowns – A transition to the mat that does not satisfy the criteria of a throw as in article S6.1 and S6.2 herein, and therefore not score may be accepted as a legal transition provided the following criteria have been met:

S6.3.1             With control – The competitor was taken to the ground with control satisfying the rules of contact; and

S6.3.2             With technique – There was technique in an attempted throw leading to unbalancing the opponent who was not merely pushed, pulled or dragged to the mat; and

S6.3.3             Immediate pinning or submission – The transition progressed immediately into a pinning technique; or was part of a controlled manoeuvre from a standing submission referring to article S5.5 (standing submission).

S6.4    Rules of Contact –Throwing

S6.4.1             Due care / Excessive force – Techniques are to be executed with due regard and care for the safety of the opponent.  The use of excessive force in the application of a technique will be penalised.

S6.4.2             Land on top – Competitors are to avoid throwing techniques that cause them to land heavily on top of their opponent in the execution of the technique.

S6.4.3             Care of head and neck – Techniques that cause a competitor to land on his or her head or neck are not permitted and will be assessed as excessive force.

ARTICLE S 7 SCORING TECHNIQUES – PINNING        

S7.1    PinningTwo (2) points may be awarded to a competitor for a legal pinning technique executed as following-on from the transition to the mat, where a judge is satisfied that the following criteria have been met:

S7.1.1             The transition – to the mat was the result of a legal technique, satisfying the rules of contact.

S7.1.2             Time – The referee signals that the pinning technique was controlled for five (5) seconds.

S7.1.3             Legal techniques – The legal pinning technique is recognised as one of the following:

a)                       A kesa-gatame (scarf hold); or

b)         A kami-shiho-gatame (upper four corner hold); or

c)         A yoko-shiho-gatame (side locking four corner hold); or

d)         A tate-shiho-gatame (longitudinal or straight four corner hold).

S7.1.4             The objective – of grappling on the ground is achievement of a legal submission (refer article S4.2 on the ground), however a competitor may score with a pinning technique following a transition to the mat.  Further pinning techniques however will not score.

Commentary 1:          The opportunity to score with a pinning technique occurs only when the technique is applied as a continuation of a throw or transition to the mat; or as part of a submission hold.

Article S 8 SCORING TECHNIQUES – STRIKES AND KICKS

S8.1    High Kick (head) – three (3) points may be awarded to a competitor for a legal martial art technique, where a judge is satisfied that the following criteria have been met:

S8.1.1             In addition to satisfying all the criteria of article S 8.2 herein – the high kick demonstrated both skill and balance in its delivery and control.

S8.2    Strikes and Kicks – One (1) point may be awarded to a competitor for a legal martial art technique, where a judge is satisfied that the following criteria have been met:

S8.2.1             The strike or kick was delivered to a legal target area and satisfied the rules of contact.

S8.2.2             Potential Force required – The strike or kick was controlled and had the ‘potential force’ to have: knocked-down, knocked-out, or incapacitated, the opponent.

S8.2.3             The technique – was controlled and focused; combination strikes or kicks will be considered on their merit. A flurry is to be considered a repetitive number of doubtful strikes and will NOT score.

S8.2.4             On the ground – Scoring of strikes to legal target areas (excluding the head) after a legal transition to the ground is limited to a maximum of three (3) striking points during the holding 30 second period, and only when the competitor is in the top position and kneeling on one or both knees. Note 1 - unless made aware 3 strikes have been scored, the competitor may exceed the number of legal strikes without penalty; Note 2 - the tactical intent is that strikes are used to assist progression to a submission.

S8.3    Legal and illegal target areas – Subject to the rules of contact:

a)         it is LEGAL to target: the outside thigh (above the knee and below the hip), and areas to the front of the body (above the waist) not elsewhere excluded.

b)         it is ILLEGAL to target: the throat, neck, back of the head, kidneys, the back; and when on the ground the head.

S8.4        Rules of Contact – strikes and kicks

S8.4.1             Contact not required – Techniques are to be controlled and limited to ‘light force’ or ‘touch contact’, as scoring is determined on ‘potential force’ a strike or kick is not required to make contact to be awarded a score.

S8.4.2             Striking weapon – Strikes and kicks must be with the padded part of the sparring gloves or shoes with the only exception being kicks with the sole or ball of the foot

S8.4.3             Outside mid-thigh kicks – are permitted when as a roundhouse kick with the padded part of the sparring shoes – any kick towards the knee will be assessed as an illegal target area and treated as excessive force.

Article S 9 ILLEGAL TECHNIQUES

S9.1    A contestant must not set out to deliberately injure his or her opponent during the match, as this will result in point’s loss or disqualification. Contestants must not use techniques that would almost certainly end up with an injury.

S9.1.1             Striking and kicking

a)         Any strike or kick other than with the padded section of the approved sparring gloves and or approved sparring shoes – exception being in kicks as permitted by article S8.4.2

b)         Strikes or kicks using any other part of the body including head butts, elbows, knees

c)         Any strike or kick below the waist except mid-thigh kicks as provided by article S8.4.3

d)         Any blind technique including blind techniques within the grapple.

S9.1.2        Throwing and Takedown

a)         Any foot sweep at mid-calf or above or using other than the instep or sole of the foot.

b)         Any improperly applied throw or takedown considered dangerous to a competitor.

c)         Any throw or takedown applied with excessive force considered dangerous to a competitor.

S9.1.3                        Grappling

a)         All choking techniques or blocking of the airway.

b)         Kicking once grappling has commenced on the ground.

c)         Striking to the head once on the ground.

d)         Attacking nerve or vital points other than as allowed by article S4.4 (nerve pressure).

e)         Locking techniques to any joint other than as defined by article S5.4.1 (joint technique).

f)          Any technique, standing or on the ground where a competitor has his or her arm around the neck, exception being a legal strangulation technique (article S5.4.2) or legal pinning technique (article S7.1); or the opponents head under his or her armpit and therefore the potential to lock or crank the neck.

g)         Lifting an opponent off the mat after coming to a standing position from a grapple.

S9.1.4                        General

a)         Any technique considered to be unsporting including: pulling hair, biting, scratching, and jumping on a downed competitor.

b)         Any technique applied or attempted by a competitor who is not within the match/contest area, exception being as provided by article O6.2.1 (competitor is out of bounds).

Article S 15           INTOLERABLE BEHAVIOUR

S15.1               Angry and uncontrolled violent displays of behaviour will not be tolerated. If a referee believes a competitor is guilty of such an infraction, he or she may call a judge’s conference. Following the conference, a majority vote of all judges will cause the offending competitor to be disqualified. Judges should not tolerate undisciplined displays of temper.

Article S 16           DISQUALIFICATION

S16.1               As an act of disqualification against a competitor may eliminate the competitor from further participation in that tournament; all disqualifications must be classified as either minor or major:

a)   Minor Disqualification – is for the existing contest only.

b)         Major Disqualification – is for the balance of the tournament or a designated period to be suggested by the majority decision of the mat referee and judges and submitted to a convened meeting of the Tournament directors for their ruling.

S16.2               Twice disqualified – Whilst not restricting the ability to issue a major disqualification, a competitor who is twice disqualified for excessive force for which a minor disqualification is awarded shall have the level of disqualification reviewed by a convened meeting of the Tournament Directors.

Article S 17           LEGAL PROTEST

S17.1               A legal protest can only be lodged for a non-compliance of the rules and can only be introduced by the official designate of the protesting association or country.

S17.2     Legal protests must be lodged with the mat arbitrator.

S17.3               If the match is still in progress – the mat arbitrator will approach the timekeeper, who will immediately notify the referee. The referee will immediately call, “Time Out”.

What are the rules in Grappling (extract)

PART 4 – GRAPPLING JU-JITSU – OFFICIATING, CONTEST AND SCORING [EXTRACT]

 

ARTICLE G 1 REFEREEING

G 1.1         There will be one referee – unless the organisers of a tournament deem it appropriate to appoint two additional referees who will be seated in chairs placed at opposing corners of the match area.

a)         Corner referees when appointed – bear the same powers as the central referee – and all or any points, advantage points or penalty points awarded must be confirmed by at least two of the three referees.

b)         Should there be a consensus between the corner referees and the central referee, the corner referees shall remain seated in the chairs at the corners of the match area.

c)         Should there be a conflict of opinion with the central referee, the corner referees should stand up and signal for points, advantage points or penalty points to be awarded or subtracted, using gestures predefined below.

ARTICLE G 2     DURATION AND OVERVIEW OF A CONTEST MATCH

G 2.1         Match Duration – All contests consist of one round of six minutes of continuous fighting following which a decision will be awarded.

G 2.2         Commencement – competitors will be called to the mat by the referee and the contest shall begin with both competitors facing each other in a standing position, the referee facing towards the table with red to his or her right and white to his or her left. After making a standing bow, the contest will start after the referee’s call to “BEGIN”. Competitors must bow to each other before and after the match and refusal to do so will constitute an immediate disqualification.

G 2.3         Within match area – competitors will compete within the match area and the referee is to always be directing the competitors to the centre of the mat.

G2.3.1 Out of bounds and stabilised – When 2/3 of the competitors’ bodies are outside the match area in a stabilised position on the ground, the referee should stop the match and, noting the position of each competitor, restart the match at the centre of the match area with the competitors in positions identical to those they were in at the moment of stoppage.

a)         The referee may be assisted by the timekeeper in moving the competitors back to the centre of the mat. In case the referee and the timekeeper are unable to move the competitors back to the centre of the mat, the competitors will be asked to walk back to the centre and continue from the same position.

G2.3.2 Out of bounds and not stabilised – When 2/3 of the competitors’ bodies are outside the match area on foot or in a non-stabilised position on the ground, the referee should stop the match and restart the two competitors on their feet at the centre of the match area.

G2.3.3 Submission hold in place – When a competitor has a submission hold in place in the outlying safety area, the referee should not interrupt the match.

G2.3.4 Submission hold defended by moving out – When a competitor has a submission hold in place and the opponent defends by moving to outside the outlying safety area; the referee should stop the match and restart the match at the centre of the match area with the competitors standing. In this case, when the referee deems it clearly apparent the competitor under attack initiated the movement that led to exiting the match area, the referee shall signal for 2 (two) points to be added to the score of the competitor performing the submission hold, as described in item G 3.2

ARTICLE G 3     DECISION OF A CONTEST MATCH

G 3.1         Referee signals scoring – will be signalled by the referee(s) during the match and recorded by the scorekeeper. The match will be awarded to the competitor who achieved a submission, or if no submission the competitor with the highest match points, or if a draw then to the competitor with the most advantage points (except where agreed that advantage points are added to the score refer article G4.1 (j)), or if still a draw to the competitor with the least penalty points.  If a draw still prevails then the referee(s) shall declare the winner on which competitor displayed greater offense during the match and came closest to achieving possible point or submission-scoring positions.

G 3.2         Submission – occurs when:

G3.2.1       The competitor signals to the referee their submission by tapping twice the opponent or mat or self; or verbally signals their submission or expresses pain while trapped in a submission hold.

G3.2.2       The referee perceives that a hold in place may expose the competitor to serious physical injury and ends the fight giving victory to the competitor that applied the lock.

G3.2.3       A coach of one of the competitors may request that the fight be ended either by directing him or herself to the referee or by throwing the towel into the contest area for any reason.

G 3.3         Disqualification – If a competitor is issued a disqualification at any time during the match this signifies a loss of the contest and the other competitor wins.

G 3.4  Injury due to a foul – If a competitor is injured due to a majority called infraction (foul) and cannot continue the offending competitor cannot be awarded the win for that match. The win must go to the injured competitor.  The medical or senior appointed qualified first-aid officer must make the decision for an injured competitor not to continue fighting and the competitor cannot recommence competing in the Tournament until he or she is given medical / first aid approval. The referee should be informed of this.

G3.4.1       Where it is ruled that a competitor has ‘intentionally’ injured their opponent this may invoke a ‘major disqualification’ as defined in article S 16.3 (Disqualification).

G 3.5         Injury not due to a foul – If a competitor sustains an injury, which is not attributed to a foul, and cannot continue then the referee will award the round accordingly.

G3.5.1       At the discretion of the referee(s), a competitor may be allowed up to 2 minutes to recover from an injury following which the competitor must either continue or the round must be decided.

G 3 6         Injury with bleeding or a wound – The match will be stopped and “time-out” called to allow the competitor to be attended to.  If the bleeding cannot be controlled within 2 minutes the round will be called as herein article G3.3 or G3.4.  Any blood on the mat surface must be cleaned before play continues.

G 3.7         Loss of consciousness – The competitor shall be declared to have lost the match upon losing consciousness due to a legal hold applied by the opponent or due to an accident not stemming from an illegal maneuver by the opponent.

G3.7.1       Note: Competitors who lose consciousness because of head trauma should not be allowed to compete again in the same tournament and should be directed to undergo treatment from medical staff.

ARTICLE G 4 REFEREES GESTURES       

G 4.1         The referee will make gestures indicated below, according with the actions – For all gestures made, the referee will raise his or her hand indicating the competitor receiving the score with right indicating red and left indicating white.

a)               Two-points Takedown, sweep and knee on the belly – The referee raises hand of arm corresponding with competitor to be awarded points with first and middle fingers extended.

b)               Three-points – Guard pass – The referee raises hand of arm corresponding with competitor to be awarded points with first, middle, and ring fingers extended.

c)               Four-point – Mount and back control – The referee raises hand of arm corresponding with competitor to be awarded points with first, middle, ring fingers, and little finger extended.

d)               Point deduction To take off an awarded point – The referee raises arm corresponding with competitor to be deducted points to shoulder height with palm open.

e)               For the interruption of the fight – match stoppage, end of match – The referee opens his or her arms together on a horizontal plane level with the shoulder.

f)                For interruption of time during the fight – The referee puts his or her hands one above the other forming a "T" signaling the timekeeper to stop the time.

g)               For lack of competitiveness – stalling – The referee raises both arms to chest height with both hands holding forearms

h)               For signaling a penalty – The referees arm corresponding with penalized competitor being raised to shoulder height with clenched fist

i)                For disqualification – The referee raises arms over head with forearms crossed and fists clenched, followed by arm corresponding with disqualified competitor pointing to competitor’s belt.

j)                One-point Advantage – One Point The referee signals with the arm corresponding with competitor to be awarded, extending parallel to mat with hand open and palm facing downwards. [Important note – Article G 7 allows for the point to be recorded with the score]  

k)               Announce match result – Arm of winning competitor raised while facing judges’ table and the arm of losing competitor held downwards.

ARTICLE G 5     POINT SCORING

G 5.1         Three seconds – Points shall be awarded by the central referee of a match whenever a competitor stabilizes a position for 3 (three) seconds.

G5.1.1       When the proper defensive counter for a submission hold results in exiting the match area, the referee shall signal 2 (two) points be awarded to the competitor applying the submission hold (as addressed in Article G 3.2

G 5.2         Match progression – Matches should unfold as a progression of positions of technical control that ultimately result in a submission hold. Therefore competitors who voluntarily relinquish a position, in order to again score points using the same position for which points have already been awarded, shall not be awarded points upon achieving the position anew.

G 5.3         While in a submission hold – Competitors who arrive at a point-scoring position while caught in a submission hold shall only be awarded points once they have freed themselves from the attack and stabilized the position for 3 (three) seconds.

G5.3.1       When one competitor comes to point-scoring positions but only gets out of the submission in hold without staying in these positions, he/she will not receive any advantage for those positions.

G 5.4         Defending a sweep – Competitors who, in defending a sweep, return their opponent back-down or sideways on the ground shall not be awarded the takedown-related two points or advantage point.

G 5.5         Competitors defending standing back-control – where the opponent has one or two hooks in place and doesn’t have one foot on the mat, shall not be awarded the takedown-related two points or advantage point, even after he/she stabilizes the position for 3 (three) seconds.

G 5.6         Competitors who begin a takedown movement – before the opponent pulls guard shall be awarded two points or an advantage point for the move, respecting the Takedown rules.

G 5.7         Points for takedown – When a competitor has a grip on his/her opponent’s pants and the opponent pulls open guard, the competitor with the grip on the pants shall be awarded two points for the takedown if he/she stabilizes the top position on the ground for 3 (three) seconds.

G5.7.1       If the opponent pulls closed guard and remains suspended in the air, the competitor will have to put the opponent’s back on the ground within 3 (three) seconds and stabilize the top position for 3 (three) seconds to be awarded with Takedown points.

G 5.8         Cumulative points – Competitors shall be awarded cumulative points when they progress through a number of point-scoring positions, as long as the three-second positional control from the final point-scoring position is a continuation of the positional control from the point-scoring positions from earlier in the sequence.

G 5.8.1      In this case, the referee shall count only 3 (three) seconds of control at the end of the sequence before signaling the points be scored (e.g., guard pass followed by mount counts for 7 [seven] points). In the case of the mount, when there is a transition straight from back mount to mount or Vice-versa—for being distinct positions—competitors shall be awarded four points for the first mount and another four points for the

ARTICLE G 6      POINT SCORING POSITIONS

G 6.1         Takedown 2 points

G6.1.1       When a competitor forces his/her opponent back-down, sideways or into a seated position on the ground after standing on two feet at some point during the movement, and keeps the fight on the ground and himself/herself in the top position for 3 (three) seconds.

G6.1.2       When a competitor forces his/her opponent to the ground on all fours or belly-down, points shall only be awarded once the competitor performing the takedown has established a back clinch on his/her opponent—hooks need not be in place but at least one of the opponent’s knees must be maintained on the ground for 3 (three) seconds.

G6.1.3       If a competitor forces his/her opponent to the ground in the outlying safety area, the competitor performing the takedown should have both feet within the match area when the movement begins. In this case, if the competitors land in a stabilized position, the match shall be restarted at the center of the match area and the competitors will be placed in the same position they were in when the match was stopped. The referee will count 3 (three) seconds of stabilization before scoring the points.

G6.1.4       When the opponent has one or two knees on the ground, the competitor performing the takedown will only be awarded points if he/she is standing at the moment the takedown is carried out. An exception may be made under circumstances addressed in Article G5.4 and respecting the 3 (three) seconds of stabilization.

G6.1.5       When the competitor forces his/her opponent to the ground using a single or double-leg takedown and the opponent lands seated and successfully applies a counter-takedown (another takedown), only the competitor performing the counter-takedown shall be awarded the two points when he/she can stabilize this position for 3 (three) seconds.

G6.1.6       For any takedown technique where the competitor, delivering his/her opponent back-down or sideways on the ground, lands in guard or half-guard and immediately suffers a successful sweep by the opponent, he/she shall be awarded an advantage relating to the takedown and his/her opponent shall be awarded the two points from the sweep.

G6.1.7       Competitors who initiate a takedown movement after the opponent has pulled guard shall not be awarded the two points or advantage point relating to the move.

G 6.2         Guard Pass 3 points

G6.2.1     When the competitor in top position manages to surmount the legs of the opponent in bottom position (pass guard or half-guard) and maintain side-control or north-south position over him/her for 3 (three) seconds.

a)         Note 1 – Guard is defined by the use of one or more legs to block the opponent from reaching side-control or north-south position over the competitor on bottom.

b)         Note 2 – Half-guard is the guard where the competitor on bottom is lying on his/her back or side and has one of the top-positioned competitor’s legs trapped, blocking him/her from achieving side - or north-south control over the bottom-positioned competitor for 3 (three) seconds.

c)         Note 3 – The position of the top competitor’s legs determines whether it is half-guard or reverse half-guard.

G 6.3         Knee-on-Belly (Knee ride) 2 points

G6.1          When the competitor on top maintaining side-control places a knee on the belly, chest or ribs of his/her opponent – who is on bottom with their back or side on the ground –, maintaining his/her other leg extended diagonally away from the opponent and his/her foot (not knee) on the ground, body facing the opponent’s head (not legs), and thus remains for 3 (three) seconds.

G 6.4         Mount and Reverse Mount 4 points –

G6.4.1       When the competitor is on top, clear of the half-guard, sitting on the opponent’s torso and with two knees or one foot and one knee on the ground, facing the opponent’s head and with up to one arm trapped under his/her leg – and thus remains for 3 (three) seconds.

G6.4.2       Should the competitor have one of the opponent’s arms trapped under his/her leg, he/she shall only be awarded points for the mount if the leg trapping the arm does not extend beyond the opponent’s shoulder.

G6.4.3       When the competitor lands on top with a triangle fastened around the opponent on bottom, no points shall be awarded for the mount.

G 6.5         Back Control 4 points –

G6.5.1       When the competitor takes control of the opponent’s back, placing his/her heels between the opponent’s thighs without crossing his/her legs and in a position to trap up to one of the opponent’s arms without trapping the arm above the shoulder line – and thus remains for 3 (three) seconds.

G 6.6         Sweep 2 points –

G6.6.1       When the competitor on bottom with the opponent in his/her guard or half-guard inverts the position, forcing the opponent who was on top to be on bottom – and maintains him/her in this position for 3 (three) seconds.

G6.6.2       When the competitor on bottom with the opponent in his/her guard or half-guard inverts the position and the opponent turns his/her back on all fours and the competitor who initiated the reversal establishes a back clinch over opponent’s back – without needing to place hooks but maintaining the opponent with at least one knee on the ground for 3 (three) seconds.

G6.6.3       When the competitor on bottom with the opponent in his/her guard or half-guard gets to his/her feet, puts the opponent down and maintains the grips necessary to hold the opponent in bottom position for 3 (three) seconds.

ARTICLE G 7      ADVANTAGESNote: it may be agreed by the Tournament directors that advantage points be recorded with the score

G 7.1         An advantage-point is counted when a competitor achieves a point-scoring pass position requiring 3 (three) seconds of control but is unable to maintain control for the entire duration.

G 7.2         An advantage is counted when the move to a point-scoring pass position is incomplete. The referee should assess whether the opponent was in any real danger and if the competitor clearly came close to reaching the point-scoring pass position.

G 7.3         The competitor shall be awarded an advantage-point when he/she attempts a submission hold where the opponent is in real danger of submitting. Again, it is the referee’s duty to assess how close the submission hold came to fruition.

G 7.4         An advantage point may be awarded by the referee even after a match has run its course but before announcing the result.

G 7.5         The referee may only award an advantage point once there is no longer a chance of the competitor reaching a point-scoring position.

G 7.6         A competitor who reaches one or multiple point-scoring positions, but is under attack from a submission hold by his/her opponent, shall be awarded with a single advantage point if he/she does not escape the attack by the end of the match.

G 7.7         Examples of Advantage Points*

G7.7.1 Advantage from takedown

a)         When a competitor achieves a takedown and his/her opponent lands back-down, sideways or in sitting position on the ground without stabilising the position for 3 (three) seconds.

b)         When a competitor, in attempting a single-leg takedown, traps one of the opponent’s legs and causes the opponent to exit the match area to avoid being taken down and oblige the referee to interrupt the match.

G7.7.2 Advantage from Guard Pass

a)       When a competitor tries to pass guard and the opponent turns on all fours.

b)         When the competitor achieves half-guard position, with exception to reverse half-guard.

c)         When a competitor places a knee on his/her opponent’s belly but only places the knee and not foot of his/her other leg on the ground.

G7.7.3 Advantage from the Mount

a)         When the competitor on top and free of guard or half-guard tries to sit on the opponent’s torso and keeps two knees or one foot and one knee on the ground while facing the opponent’s head but with both the opponent’s arms trapped under his/her legs.

G7.7.4 Advantage from Back Control

a)         When a competitor mounts his/her opponent’s back and places his/her heels between the opponent’s thighs but traps both the opponent’s arms.

b)         When a competitor mounts his/her opponent’s back but crosses his/her legs, fastens a figure-four around the waist or only places one heel between the opponent’s thighs.

G7.7.5 Advantage from Sweep

a)         When, upon clearly causing the opponent to lose his/her balance, a competitor attempts to complete the sweep movement and forces the opponent out of the match area.

b)         When a competitor attempts a sweep from closed guard, takes down the opponent, and opens guard in an attempt to achieve top position but is unable to complete the sweep movement.

c)         In 50/50 guard, when attempting a sweep, the competitor takes the opponent down and unlocks his/her legs in an attempt to achieve top position but is unable to complete the sweep movement.

d)         When both competitors pull guard at the same time, the competitor who achieves top position first is awarded an advantage point.

Note*  The examples above are merely illustrative and do not represent the full array of situations that may warrant advantage points.

G7.7.6 Specific Cases where Advantage Points are not awarded anymore

a)         Achieving half-guard does not warrant an advantage point for a competitor who was in mounted or side-control position.

b)         Competitors who suffer a takedown from the opponent and manage to roll to top position shall no longer be awarded an advantage point by the referee.

c)         Competitors who begin a sweep movement but deliberately do not seek to complete the movement, in order to retain their defensive position, shall not be awarded an advantage point for the sweep.

ARTICLE G 8      FOULS

G 8.1         Fouls are technical or disciplinary infractions addressed in the rules that are committed by competitors before, during or after a match.

G 8.2         Foul Classifications

a)               Severe Foul – Subdivided into technical fouls, and disciplinary fouls.

b)               Serious Foul

c)               Combativeness Foul (Stalling)

G8.2.1 Severe Foul

a)         Technical Fouls

i)          When a competitor’s gi is rendered unusable and he/she is unable to exchange it for a new one within a period of time stipulated by the referee

ii)         When a competitor deliberately flees the match area to avoid submitting to a submission hold applied by his/her opponent

iii)        When a competitor intentionally attempts to get his or her opponent disqualified by reacting in a way that places his or her opponent in an illegal position

iv)        When a competitor is not wearing an undergarment under his/her gi and this fact comes to the referee’s attention

v)         In the Jiu-Jitsu No-Gi, when a competitor applies creams, oils, gels or any slippery substance to any part of the body

vi)        When the competitor utilizes any substance that increase the adherence in any part of his/her body

vii)       When the competitor utilizes any substance that makes the kimono slippery for the grips.

viii)      When a competitor applies a hold prohibited for his/her respective age or belt group, as indicated in the table below.*

b)         Technical Fouls – Illegal Moves – When a competitor intentionally attempts to get his or her opponent disqualified by reacting in a way that places his or her opponent in an illegal position.

c)       Disciplinary Fouls

i)          When a competitor directs profane language or obscene gestures at his/her opponent, the centre table, table officials, referee or public.

ii)         When a competitor exhibits hostile behaviour towards an opponent, referee or any other member of the organizing committee or public.

iii)        When a competitor bites, pulls hair, strikes or applies pressure to the genitals or eyes, or intentionally uses a traumatic blow of any kind (such as punches, elbows, knees, head butts, kicks, etc).

iv)        When a competitor exhibits offensive or disrespectful behaviour towards an opponent or the public through words or gestures during a match or in celebrating victory.

G8.2.2 Serious Fouls

a)         When a competitor kneels or sits without having a grip of any kind on the opponent.

b)         When a standing competitor flees the bounds of the match area, avoiding combat with the opponent

c)         When a standing competitor pushes his/her opponent to outside the match area without clear intent of attempting a submission or scoring. (Note: previously, the competitor being pushed was the one penalised).

d)         When a competitor on the ground evades combat by sliding his/herself outside the match area.

e)         When a competitor on the ground stands to escape combat and does not return to combat on the ground.

f)         When a competitor breaks the grip of the opponent pulling guard and does not return to combat on the ground.

g)         When a competitor intentionally removes his/her own gi or belt, causing the match to be stopped.

h)         When a competitor grabs the opening of the opponent’s sleeve or pant leg with the fingers placed inside the garment, even if performing a sweep or any other manoeuvre

i)          When a competitor grabs the inside of the opponent’s gi top or pants, and when a competitor passes a hand through the inside of the opponent’s gi to grip the external part of the gi.

j)          When a competitor communicates with the referee by speaking or with gestures, except when he/she is reporting a medical issue.

k)         When a competitor disobeys a referee order.

l)          When a competitor exits the match area following a match prior to the referee announcing the result.* – * For these specific cases there is no gesture for penalisation and the referee will signal one penalty be added on the scoreboard for the perpetrating competitor and concede at least one advantage point to the opponent, in accordance with the series of penalties addressed in Article G 9.3

m)        When a competitor deliberately exits the match area to prevent the opponent from completing a sweep.** – ** In this case and only this case, the referee should signal two points be awarded to the opponent and one penalty point be added to the score of the competitor who exited the match area.

n)         For Jiu-Jitsu No-Gi, when a competitor grabs hold of his/her uniform or that of his/her opponent in any way

o)         When a competitor places a hand or foot on his/her opponent’s face.

p)         When a competitor intentionally places his/her foot in his/her opponent’s belt.

q)         When a competitor intentionally places a foot in the opponent’s lapel without gripping the same side of the lapel with his/her hand.

r)          When a competitor places a foot in the lapel behind the opponent’s neck, with or without gripping it.

s)         When a competitor uses his/her own belt or the opponent’s belt to assist in a choke or any other circumstance in a match while the belt is untied.

t)          When a competitor, without using the gi, strangles his/her opponent using both hands, or applies pressure to the opponent’s windpipe using the thumb.

u)         When a competitor holds the neck using both hands (one in front and one behind).

v)         When a competitor blocks the passage of air to his/her opponent’s nose or mouth using his/her hands.

w)        When a competitor takes more than 20 seconds to tie his/her belts during a match stoppage (when the competitor is also using the identification belt).

x)         When a competitor runs around the match area and does not engage in the combat

y)         When a competitor unintentionally reacts in a way that places his/her opponent in an illegal position

G8.2.3 Lack of Combativeness (stalling)

a)         Lack of combativeness (stalling) is defined by one competitor clearly not pursuing positional progression in a match and also when a competitor impedes his/her opponent from carrying out said progression.

b)         When both competitors simultaneously demonstrate a lack of combativeness (stalling) in any position in a match.

c)         Lack of combativeness (stalling) is not declared when a competitor is defending his/herself from an opponent’s attacks from mount, back-control, side-control or north-south positions.

d)         Examples of situations constituting lack of combativeness (stalling).*

i)          When a competitor, upon achieving side-control or north-south positions over an opponent, does not seek positional progression.

ii)         When a competitor in an opponent’s closed guard does not seek to pass guard and at the same time prevents the opponent from seeking positional progression from guard.

iii)        When the bottom competitor playing closed guard wraps his/her arms around the opponent’s back or performs any other controlling movement clutching the opponent to him/her without intending to achieve a submission or score.

iv)        When a competitor on foot grabs and maintains his/her hand on the opponent’s belt, preventing the opponent from completing a takedown movement and without attempting an attack of any kind.

Note*  The aforementioned examples are merely illustrative and do not represent all the situations that may be deemed lack of combativeness (stalling).

ARTICLE G 9      PENALTIES

G 9.1         Penalties are awarded by referees with the aim of assuring the match flows properly and that the rules of the sport and the competition are being respected.  Referees shall abide by the following series of penalties for each category of penalty.

G 9.2         Severe Penalties

G9.2.1       Technical Penalties: Summary disqualification from the match at the moment of the infraction.

G9.2.2       Disciplinary Penalties: Summary disqualification from the match and competition at the moment of the infraction.

G 9.3         Serious Penalties

G9.3.1       Referees shall abide by the following series of penalties.

a)       1st penalty – The referee will mark the first penalty for the competitor.

b)         2nd penalty – Advantage point concession to opponent of penalized competitor and second penalty marked on scoreboard for perpetrating competitor.

c)         3rd penalty –Two points concession to opponent of penalized competitor and third penalty marked on scoreboard for perpetrating competitor.

d)         4th penalty – Disqualification of perpetrating competitor.*

G9.3.2       Serious penalties are cumulative between them and different fouls will bring into effect the escalating penalty sequence addressed in Article G9.3.1

G9.3.3       If the competitor has already received penalties for lack of combativeness on the scoreboard, these penalties will be added to the penalties for serious fouls.

Note *       In the under-15-year-old events, on a competitor’s fourth and fifth fouls the referee shall award two points to the opponent and one penalty point to the perpetrating competitor for each penalty. Only on the sixth penalty shall the referee disqualify the perpetrating competitor.

G 9.4         Penalties for lack of combativeness

G9.4.1       The penalties for lack of combativeness will follow the sequence below after the referee considers one or both competitors been under the situations described in article G8.2.3

Note*        The referee shall count out 20 (twenty) consecutive seconds and will perform the gesture for a lack of combativeness (in concordance of article G 4), followed by the verbal command “LUTE!” and the gesture for the awarded penalty, as described in article G9.3.1

G9.4.2       If the competitor has already received penalties for serious fouls on the scoreboard, these penalties will be added to the penalties for lack of combativeness.

 

Are there rules for Junior competition

YES - These are an appropriately modified form of the adult rules

Does the WCJJO provide rules for any other form of competition

YES - The WCJJO Tournament Rules also included Tanto (Knife) defence competition

What are the different competing events within the rules

There are five separate events:

  1. Sport Ju-jitsu Individual Events - men's and ladies weight divisions
  2. Sport Ju-jitsu Masters Individual Events - men's and ladies weight divisions
  3. Sport Ju-jitsu Country Team Events - men's and ladies weight divisions
  4. Grappling Ju-jitsu Individual Events - men's and ladies weight divisions
  5. Demonstration Event

 

What are the weight divisions (extract)

Article 3     PARTICIPATION AND WEIGHT DIVISIONS [EXTRACT]

3.3          Sport Ju-jitsu individual events – men’s and ladies

3.3.1                          Men’s Individual Weight Divisions:

a)         Division 1                                under     62.0 kg (136.7 lbs)

b)         Division 2                                under     68.0 kg (149.9 lbs)

c)         Division 3                                under     75.0 kg (165.3 lbs)

d)         Division 4                                under     82.0 kg (180.8 lbs)

e)         Division 5                                under     90.0 kg (198.4 lbs)

f)          Division 6                                under     100.0 kg (220.5 lbs)

g)         Division 7                                                100.0 kg (220.5 lbs) and over

3.3.2                          Ladies Individual Weight Divisions:

a)         Division 1                                under     52.0 kg (114.6 lbs)

b)         Division 2                                under     57.0 kg (125.7 lbs)

c)         Division 3                                under     63.0 kg (138.9 lbs)

d)         Division 4                                under     70.0 kg (154.3 lbs)

e)         Division 5                                under     78.0 kg (172.0 lbs)

f)          Division 6                                under     88.0 kg (194.0 lbs)

g)         Division 7                                                88.0 kg (194.0 lbs) and over

Tournament directors may after the official weigh-in; agree to change the ladies weight divisions and the number of divisions, to more appropriately group competitors who register to compete.

3.3.3                Competing in a higher division – In the individual events men’s and ladies, competitors may only compete in their own weight division: Provided the Tournament directors may agree that competitors be permitted to compete in a higher division where an association has more than two competitors in the one weight division.

3.4          Sport Ju-jitsu individual masters events – men’s and ladies

Weight divisions – Each association may register up to 6 competitors aged 40 years and over to compete in the master’s event.  The Tournament directors will after the official weigh-in, agree on two or more weight divisions in both the men’s and ladies masters event determined on the weights and the number of competitors who register to compete.

3.5          Sport Ju-Jitsu Championship Country Team Event

3.5.1                Weight divisions – each country team will comprise the weight divisions as set-down in article 3.2 herein: Provided if there are insufficient competitors to compete in Division 1 and or Division 7 then these divisions may need to be excluded from the Teams.

3.5.2                Team Selection – The country team for this event both men’s and ladies, will be decided following the completion of the individual events, at which time the seven (7) competitors (one from each weight division subject to article 3.5.1, who performed best in the individuals will be invited to enter the team event competing for the country championship.  If two or more competitors qualify within a weight division, in the first instance the member association delegate(s) shall agree who to select, however if no agreement is reached then the appointed country representative with the Tournament directors shall decide.

3.5.3                Injury substitute – In the event of an injury to a championship team member another competitor in the same weight division (or lower) may substitute onto the championship team. Once a substitution has been made, the injured competitor cannot return the team competition, but may still participate in other events.

3.5.4                In-team substitute – If a weight division is filled by another team member that person would compete twice, both in their own weight division and in the higher substituted weight division. The only exception is the lowest division, which has no substitution in which case his or her rounds are forfeited throughout the balance of the tournament.

3.5.5                Mixed Country Team – Subject to the agreement of a majority of delegates:

a)         A country that has not less than four competitors for their championship team, may accept a person(s) from another competing country to make up a full team.

b)         Competitors from different countries may combine to form a men’s or ladies team that will be appropriately designated based on the area of the World from where the competitors come.

These competitors must then compete in all team events and stay with that team throughout the team competition.

3.6          Grappling Ju-jitsu individual events – men’s and ladies

3.6.1                          Men’s Individual Weight Divisions:

a)                      Division 1                          under               55.0 kg (121.3 lbs)

b)                      Division 2                          under               61.0 kg (134.5 lbs)

c)                      Division 3                          under               67.0 kg (147.7 lbs)

d)                      Division 4                          under               73.0 kg (160.9 lbs)

e)                      Division 5                          under               79.0 kg (174.2 lbs)

f)                       Division 6                          under               85.0 kg (187.4 lbs)

g)                      Division 7                          under               91.0 kg (200.6 lbs)

h)                      Division 8                          under               97.0 kg (213.8 lbs)

i)                       Division 9                                                   97.0 kg (213.8 lbs) and over

Tournament Directors may after the official weigh-in; agree to change the divisions and the number of divisions to more appropriately group competitors who register to compete.

3.6.2                          Ladies Individual Weight Divisions:

a)                      Division 1                          under               51.0 kg (112.4 lbs)

b)                      Division 2                          under               56.0 kg (123.5 lbs)

c)                      Division 3                          under               61.0 kg (134.5 lbs)

d)                      Division 4                          under               66.0 kg (145.5 lbs)

e)                      Division 5                          under               71.0 kg (156.5 lbs)

f)                       Division 6                                                   71.0 kg (156.5 lbs) and over

Tournament Directors may after the official weigh-in; agree to change the divisions and the number of divisions to more appropriately group competitors who register to compete.

3.6.3                Competing in a higher division – In the individual grappling events men’s and ladies, competitors may only compete in their own weight division: Provided the Tournament directors may agree that competitors be permitted to compete in a higher division where an association has more than two competitors in the one weight division.

3.7          Demonstration Event

3.7.1                Participation – Each association may enter one demonstration team and while there is no limit on the number of persons within the team, there will only be 6 medals available within each place: first, second and third: Provided that two or more associations from the same country may join to make-up a demonstration team. Weight divisions do not apply and a team may include junior competitors.

3.7.2                 Time limits – The demonstration shall be performed in two parts one following the other, both of not less than five-minute duration provided the total time does not exceed 12-minutes with the time commencing once the team leader acknowledges the judges.

a)         Part 1 Technical maximum score 15 points – shall demonstrate technical aspects of ju-jitsu within the chosen style and will be assessed on variety of technique and technical merit.

b)         Part 2 Entertainment maximum score 10 points – shall provide an entertaining demonstration of ju-jitsu techniques and will be assessed on entertainment value for spectators. The association may choose to play appropriate music during the Part 2 demonstration.

3.7.3                 Judges score and time penalties – Five judges shall be appointed from different countries with the lowest score and highest score in each section (technical and entertainment) being discounted and the remaining scores, of the three judges, accumulated. Two-points shall then be deleted for each minute (or part thereof) under five (5) minutes on both Part 1 and Part 2; plus two-points for each minute (or part thereof) over the total of twelve (12) minutes.

 

How does sport ju-jitsu compare with mixed martial art (MMA)

Ju-jitsu evolved in Japan at a time of feudalism and as Japan moved to the Meiji period (1867-1912) with the abolition of the shogunal system and restoration of power to the emperor, this brought an end to the system of feudal domains, Daimyō the powerful warlords of feudal Japan, and the samurai class as a whole.

In the publication "The Fighting Spirit of Japan" by E.J. Harrison, referring to ju-jitsu tournaments, he quotes Sakujiro Yokoyama as saying …

In those days contests were extremely rough and frequently cost the participants their lives. Thus, whenever I sallied forth to take part in any of those affairs, I invariably bade farewell to my parents, since I had no assurance that I should ever return alive.

To-day ju-jitsu tournament and the rules of competition are obviously very different, and competitors who compete in WCJJO sport ju-jitsu tournaments adhere to strict rules of safety.

This is not to suggest that the techniques demonstrated in competition reflect the total of ju-jitsu, and one should differentiate between ju-jitsu and sport ju-jitsu.

Over time, as a true student of a martial art, one comes to appreciate the depth and breadth of knowledge and competency required to become a master within that art. This is very different to the cross training and learning outcomes from practicing a variety of martial arts as promoted within mixed martial art tournaments.

You will observe in mixed martial art tournaments that different competitors have varied skill in: throwing their opponent; grappling with their opponent; immobilisation of a joint; or successful application of strangulation; while others may rely more upon striking and kicking their opponent … but wait WCJJO sport ju-jitsu includes all of these, without the need to cross train.  So what’s the difference?

The obvious difference is in WCJJO sport ju-jitsu there is no cage, and a competitor is free at any time to step into a safe area surrounding the mat … Next - the level of allowed contact under WCJJO rules is ‘touch contact’ with strict rules on what might be deemed as excessive force … one might suggest that WCJJO sport ju-jitsu is MMA without the lust for blood.

GLOVES and FOOT Protection - What Safety Equipment is required to be worn in sport ju-jitsu tournaments [extract]

Gloves 445 x 273

Safety Equipment - Sport Ju-Jitsu [Extract ARTICLE 8]

The use of safety equipment i.e. approved sparring gloves, sparring shoes, mouth guard, and a groin protector (females optional) are mandatory except for Demonstration and Grappling Ju-jitsu Division.  Gloved Hand - 445 x 273 b

Sparring gloves:      Shall consist of a minimum 25mm (1 inch) thick pliable material covering all of the striking area of the hand including both sets of knuckles when the fist is closed and without raised seams or stitching. The WCJJO has determined to standardise the make and style of glove to be worn by all competitors and Directors will be advised on the gloves to be worn.

Instep and Shin Protector

 

 

NEW - The requirement for 'Sparring Shoes' has been removed from the Rules ... These are now replaced by a new provision requiring competitors wear:

  • Compulsory - 'Instep Protectors' OR combined 'Instep and Shin Protectors' - that shall consist of stretch material with padding covering the instep area of the foot AND if including the shin then padding also covering the shin area of the leg.

 

NOTE - See also: Competitors Required Dress

What are the eligibility criteria for competitors at the World Championships (extract)

 

ARTICLE 1 ELIGIBLE COMPETITORS (extract)
 

 

1.1 WCJJO Membership – All competitors must belong to a member or provisional member association of the World Council of Ju-jitsu Organisations (WCJJO), in good standing of their respective association and be of amateur sport status. Competitors must have attained a rank or grade equivalent to:
a) Sport Ju-jitsu – a minimum senior Ju-jitsu grade of 2nd Kyu with three years training in Ju-jitsu
b) Grappling Ju-jitsu – a minimum senior Brazilian Jiu Jitsu grade of Purple Belt

 

1.2 Persons of an equivalent grade standard from other related martial arts that include training and possess competency in each of the areas covered by these rules and belong to a member or provisional member association of the WCJJO, in good standing of their respective association, may be accepted to participate in the competitions of the WCJJO.

 

1.3 Citizenship and positive proof of domicile will dictate the country the fighter represents subject to article 3.5.5 (mixed country team). Documents such as a passport and drivers license may be requested.

 

1.4 Knowledge of risks – Competitors shall attest to their knowledge of the risks involved in participating in a tournament by completing a Competition Participation Agreement Waiver and Indemnity (refer Appendix D). Competitors must be not less than 18 years of age and persons who are less than the legal adult age either within their own country or the host country of the competition may only participate if their parent or legal guardian signs on their behalf.

 

1.5 Health and fitness of competitors – participating in competition is to be attested to by the respective Association.

 

1.6 Required dress – Competitors must present themselves suitably attired in a clean, traditional uniform (Gi) with a formal rank belt. Tournament Gi’s that are a traditional type wrap over with minimum three quarter (¾) length sleeves are the only ones that the competitor will be allowed to compete in. This rule will be enforced in all tournaments. Accept for female competitors, T-shirts are not to be worn under the Gi unless an acceptable reason can be provided.

 

1.7 Personal items – jewellery must be removed and long finger or toe nails must be cut or covered. The wearing of eyeglasses during competition will not be allowed however contact lenses are acceptable.

 

1.8 Coloured Belts – For purposes of identification during a match one competitor will wear a red belt and the other competitor a white belt, coloured flags or pennants attached to the belt are not permitted. Personal grade belts will not to be worn while competing.

What is the required dress for competitors

ARTICLE 1.6 - Required Dress (extract)
Competitors must present themselves suitably attired in a clean, traditional uniform (Gi) with a formal rank belt. Tournament Gi’s that are a traditional type wrap over with minimum three quarter (¾) length sleeves are the only ones that the competitor will be allowed to compete in. This rule will be enforced in all tournaments. Accept for female competitors, T-shirts are not to be worn under the Gi unless an acceptable reason can be provided.

 

Note - See also: Safety Equipment - Gloves and Shoes