Rules Extract

 

1. How does sport ju-jitsu compare with mixed martial art (MMA)

       

… 2 …

”2.

… 3 …

[accordion title=”3. 

… 4 …

”4.

… 5 …

[accordion title=”5.   

… 6 …

1. How does sport ju-jitsu compare with mixed martial art (MMA)

How does sport ju-jitsu compare with mixed martial art (MMA).  Ju-jitsu evolved in Japan at a time of feudalism and as Japan moved to the Meiji period (1867-1912) with the abolition of the shogunal system and restoration of power to the emperor, this brought an end to the system of feudal domains, Daimyō the powerful warlords of feudal Japan, and the samurai class as a whole. In the publication “The Fighting Spirit of Japan” by E.J. Harrison, referring to ju-jitsu tournaments, he quotes Sakujiro Yokoyama as saying … In those days contests were extremely rough and frequently cost the participants their lives. Thus, whenever I sallied forth to take part in any of those affairs, I invariably bade farewell to my parents, since I had no assurance that I should ever return alive.

To-day ju-jitsu tournament and the rules of competition are obviously very different, and competitors who compete in WCJJO sport ju-jitsu tournaments adhere to strict rules of safety. This is not to suggest that the techniques demonstrated in competition reflect the total of ju-jitsu, and one should differentiate between ju-jitsu and sport ju-jitsu. Over time, as a true student of a martial art, one comes to appreciate the depth and breadth of knowledge and competency required to become a master within that art. This is very different to the cross training and learning outcomes from practicing a variety of martial arts as promoted within mixed martial art tournaments. You will observe in mixed martial art tournaments that different competitors have varied skill in: throwing their opponent; grappling with their opponent; immobilisation of a joint; or successful application of strangulation; while others may rely more upon striking and kicking their opponent … but wait WCJJO sport ju-jitsu includes all of these, without the need to cross train. So what’s the difference? The obvious difference is in WCJJO sport ju-jitsu there is no cage, and a competitor is free at any time to step into a safe area surrounding the mat … Next – the level of allowed contact under WCJJO rules is ‘touch contact’ with strict rules on what might be deemed as excessive force … one might suggest that WCJJO sport ju-jitsu is MMA without the lust for blood.

… 7 …

”7.

” active=”no”] GLOVES and FOOT Protection – What Safety Equipment is required to be worn in sport ju-jitsu tournaments [extract] Safety Equipment – Sport Ju-Jitsu [Extract ARTICLE 8] Compulsory – The use of safety equipment i.e. approved sparring gloves or mitts, instep protectors, mouth guard, and a groin protector (females optional) are mandatory except for Demonstration and Grappling Ju-jitsu Events. Ju-jitsu Division. Gloved Hand – 445 x 273 b Sparring Hand Protectors – (compulsory) shall consist of soft foam padding (not less than 1cm or more than 2cm thick) covering the back of the hand metacarpals and proximal phalanges of the four fingers. Covering the thumb is optional The WCJJO may standardise the make and style of glove to be worn by all competitors – meantime the illustration which is from Century Martial Arts provides a guide as to the type of glove acceptable Sparring Instep Protectors – (compulsory) shall consist of soft foam padding covering the instep area of the foot … see picture. Shin guards – (optional) that are part of or compliment the Instep Protector and are of the same material. Instep and Shin Protector NOTE – See also: Competitors Required Dress

… 8 …

8. What are the eligibility criteria for competitors at the World Championships (extract)

What are the eligibility criteria for competitors at the World Championships (extract) ARTICLE 1 ELIGIBLE COMPETITORS (extract) 1.1 WCJJO Membership – All competitors must belong to a member or provisional member association of the World Council of Ju-jitsu Organisations (WCJJO), in good standing of their respective association and be of amateur sport status. Competitors must have attained a rank or grade equivalent to: a) Sport Ju-jitsu – a minimum senior Ju-jitsu grade of 2nd Kyū with three years training in Ju-jitsu b) Grappling Ju-jitsu – a minimum senior Brazilian Jiu Jitsu grade of Purple Belt 1.2 Persons of an equivalent grade standard from other related martial arts that include training and possess competency in each of the areas covered by these rules and belong to a member or provisional member association of the WCJJO, in good standing of their respective association, may be accepted to participate in the competitions of the WCJJO. 1.3 Citizenship and positive proof of domicile will dictate the country the fighter represents subject to article 3.5.5 (mixed country team). Documents such as a passport and driver’s license may be requested. 1.4 Knowledge of risks – Competitors shall attest to their knowledge of the risks involved in participating in a tournament by completing a Competition Participation Agreement Waiver and Indemnity (refer Appendix D). Competitors must be not less than 18 years of age and persons who are less than the legal adult age either within their own country or the host country of the competition may only participate if their parent or legal guardian signs on their behalf. 1.5 Health and fitness of competitors – participating in competition is to be attested to by the respective Association. 1.6 Required dress – Competitors must present themselves suitably attired in a clean, traditional uniform (Gi) with a formal rank belt. Tournament Gi’s that are a traditional type wrap over with minimum three quarter (¾) length sleeves are the only ones that the competitor will be allowed to compete in. This rule will be enforced in all tournaments. Accept for female competitors, T-shirts are not to be worn under the Gi unless an acceptable reason can be provided. 1.7 Personal items – jewellery must be removed, and long finger or toe nails must be cut or covered. The wearing of eyeglasses during competition will not be allowed however contact lenses are acceptable. 1.8 Coloured Belts – For purposes of identification during a match one competitor will wear a red belt and the other competitor a white belt, coloured flags or pennants attached to the belt are not permitted. Personal grade belts will not to be worn while competing.

… 9 …

9. What is the required dress for competitors

What is the required dress for competitors ARTICLE 1.6 – Required Dress (extract) Competitors must present themselves suitably attired in a clean, traditional uniform (Gi) with a formal rank belt. Tournament Gi’s that are a traditional type wrap over with minimum three quarter (¾) length sleeves are the only ones that the competitor will be allowed to compete in. This rule will be enforced in all tournaments. Accept for female competitors, T-shirts or Rashies are not to be worn under the Gi unless an acceptable reason can be provided. Note – See also: Safety Equipment – Gloves and Shoes